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“We have some decisions to make…” on the U.S. colony of Honduras

5 January 2010

Philip Crowley, spokesman for the United States Department of State  Spokesman was asked yesterday about  Deputy Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs Craig Kelly, and the purpose of Kelly’s visit to  Tegucigalpa… and by extension, the viability of the so-called “San Jose Accords.”

Some of that "clear tension" as presented on French television (misidentified as Iranian "popular resistence")

Crowley, insisting the United States still had a job to do to ” move forward and to overcome the clear tension that resulted in the actions taken last June” (i.e., a coup) said:

… we do have some decisions to make in the future about the future nature of our relationship. As we said back in November, the election was a step forward. We felt that the results did reflect the will of the Honduran people. That said, the election by itself was not enough to – we have some decisions to make in terms of the nature of our relationship, the nature of assistance in the future.

So there are still steps that Honduras has to take, and we are encouraged by comments by President-elect Lobo, but we are there to continue to move this process forward not only to get to January 27, but most importantly, to see that government advance once it’s in office.

The San Jose Accords, forced on the legitimate government by the United States and the military backed regime that had hustled the president out of the country (in his PJs), then used a forged resignation letter (with the wrong date on it!) to justify his replacement by a guy who — went back on his promise to resign in favor of a “coalition government” (make up of those who backed the coup-mongers, and those who… didn’t oppose it) — has clung to power as highly dubious elections (considered illegitimate by all but the United States and Panama) elected a replacement … who has to “advance” Craig Kelly’s, and the United States’, interests… not the Hondurans.

Change we can believe in.

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