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I met a man who wasn’t there

6 June 2012

Fascinating!    Juanita Jean, not only proprietor of the world’s most dangerous hair salon is a by-God Texan, but she’s also Cajun, and sometimes ventures across state lines in search of the best in southern political weirdness.  Louisiana, being sorta kinda Latin America has always had a peculiar streak, but this ad, from the Lafayette Daily Advertiser is something I’ve never seen before… honest to goodness U.S. right-wing tin-foil hat conspiracy theories “proven”  with right wing Mexican propaganda.

Honestly, I’m still too marginally sane to follow the logic of whatever it is the this Acadian Patriot are is against*, but seeing how they’re sort of recommending the the U.S. film “For Greater Glory” — which in turn lets me drum up sales for “Gorostieta and the Cristiada: Mexico’s Catholic Insurgency 1926-1929” —  I’ve taken a stab at trying to figure out what the ad is about.

They’re opposing  “Agenda 21”  some United Nations statement of goals on sustainable development.  Somehow  sustainable development is a threat to religion, and apparently United Nations pronouncements on the subject will lead to zoning ordinances, which will be used by Barack Obama  to … oh… (and here’s where I get lost) have non-existent priests in the non-existent “Town of Jalisco, Mexico” shot.  And sap us of our precious bodily fluids, no doubt.

Father Francisco Vera’s  photo has become quite popular of late with a whole new generation of conspiracy theorists:  85 years after he didn’t die, since he never lived, in an execution that never took place,  in a town that didn’t exist.

* Sombrero tip to Jason Dormady, who spoke with the director of Acadian Patriots.  The ad was placed by a member of the organization, which thinks Democrats and Republicans are both likely to “shoot Catholics and Christians”.

4 Comments leave one →
  1. Hugo permalink
    6 June 2012 2:20 pm

    The photo forms part of a Spanish propaganda publication from about 1928. It is mentioned in Ana Maria Serna’s article on the written battle to win public support for the two sides in the Cristero conflict: http://redalyc.uaemex.mx/pdf/351/35111319007.pdf

    She writes that there are 36 folders with stories about these Mexican martyrs:
    Una colección de 36 números de “hojitas” editadas también por Isart Durán
    Editores, s. a. en Barcelona dedica casi todos sus números a los “Mártires
    de León, Zamora, Puebla, Sacerdotes Mártires de Guadalajara, Parras, El Mártir de
    Tlálpan, El Primer Mártir Jesuita, El Reverendo padre Pro, camino del suplicio,
    Los Mártires de Momax”.

    The folder with P. Vera seems to be on sale:
    http://www.todocoleccion.net/sacerdotes-martires-mexico-p-francisco-vera-momento-ser-fusilado-1928~x23193009

    Hugo

  2. Juanita Cortez permalink
    6 June 2012 5:39 pm

    What about all the people that were killed by Torquemada? Do we have any pictures?

  3. 6 June 2012 6:20 pm

    Photoshop was a lot easier in the pre-photography days. Plenty of woodcuts and painting, especially from British anti-Catholic sources. Not that the Inquisition wasn’t real, but that everybody in Europe was merrily doing much the same thing to heretics.

  4. 10 June 2012 8:00 pm

    I am a transplanted Cajun in Honduras. I find that ad ridiculous yet believable that it ran in the heart of Acadiana.

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